Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Lectionary resource

Here is a great resource for students of the historic Western lectionary - it includes some great 16th century woodcuts geared to the Gospel lessons.

This is a Roman resource, so you'll have to consult your copy of Luther Reed's The Lutheran Liturgy for those places in which the Lutheran lectionary differs from Rome. These differences, more often than not, are because the Lutherans are maintaining the northern European lessons which differed slightly from what was current in Rome, mostly in the order of certain Gospel lessons.

What? Don't have a copy of Reed? It's one you just have to have. Go to bookfinder.com and pick up a used copy. There are a couple going right now for $14 shipped. That's a deal. Rush out now in a buying frenzy.
+HRC

6 comments:

  1. For a brief comparison of the Lutheran, Roman and Anglican annual cycle lectionaries, one can be found at Lexorandi.org

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  2. Wonderful, Deacon! Thanks for that at-a-glance resource.

    +HRC

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  3. Here is another helpful resource for the traditional lectionary: Lectionary Central. This is something the n00b three-year Vatican II lectionary can't do. ;-)

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  4. Please provide a prayer for altar guild to use when consecrated body and blood have been contaminated with H1N1 flu, and thus must be discarded into the altar guild garden.
    Kind Regards,
    Arta

    artadobbs@cox.net

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  5. Mrs. Dobbs,

    I would encourage you to ask your pastor to deal with such a case. This is why he is called to be a pastor: to see to it that the Word is preached and the Sacraments administered properly.

    How one would know that the Sacred Elements had been "contaminated" with a flu bug is a bit beyond me - so I would first instruct a pastor just to consume all that has been consecrated himself.

    However, the Church has, sadly, had to make provision for the proper dispostion of Sacred Elements that have been desecrated by evil men beyond such a point where they can be consummed. In such a case, a host is to be dissolved in water and then poured into sacred ground. Likewise, a chalice should be heavily diluted with water and then poured into sacred ground.

    A proper prayer for such an occasion would be the Kyrie.

    +HRC

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  6. Here is a good thing to emphasize: the pastor himself should consume or reserve all that has been consecrated. Arguably this is part of what proper administration of the Sacrament includes.

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